Wheelie bin news roundup 12th March

A refuse collector in Slough was knocked down by a driver who hadn’t cleared their windscreen of frost and ice completely. The man was pulling wheelie bins from the pavement to the vehicle when the car hit him, and colleagues rushed to help. Paramedics were called to treat the man, who was unable to walk due to his injuries. The driver has been interviewed by the police, and this marked the second incident involving a driver and a refuse collector in Slough in just one week.

A spokesperson for the Borough Council said that the refuse collector suffered severe bruising and would be off work for up to eight weeks.

In a separate incident, a refuse collector was guiding a reversing refuse vehicle, when a car, which had been waiting, drove into him. Luckily, the man suffered only minor injuries.

Both incidents were caught on the CCTV cameras which are now fitted to the council’s new fleet of refuse vehicles.

The council have advised drivers not to overtake refuse vehicles and to pay attention to what is going on around them. They added that every incident has an impact on both collections and on the people who have suffered injury, and it’s unacceptable.

Both of the refuse collectors were offered counselling and support from managers and colleagues.

The city council in Cork is set to crack down on wheelie bins blocking footpaths as part of measures being introduced to tackle waste dumping in the city. The council are proposing to clamp down on the hours that bins can be left out in the street and introducing new measures to enforce the rules on people putting rubbish in other people’s bins.

The council recognise that enforcing the rules in some areas will be difficult because there’s nowhere to store bins, so the only choice is to leave them out on the street. However, the council added that when wheelie bins are left out on the street, they obstruct footpaths, spoil the look of an area, and encourage the illegal dumping of waste.

Heftier fines for people who dump waste illegally are also on the agenda. Currently, if an enforcement officer finds any information among the rubbish that identifies the culprit, they can issue a fine. The new proposals would allow officers to issue fines to more than one person if they can be identified by the contents of a rubbish bag.

Youngsters in Immingham have been taking their neighbours’ rubbish in wheelie bins to collection points introduced by the council during the recent spell of severe weather.

The children, dubbed the “Bin Kids of Immingham” spent hours wheeling the bins to a collection point at the town’s Civic Centre during time they had off school due to the icy weather.

North East Lincolnshire Council had suspended bin collections because the icy conditions meant that bin lorries were unable to get down many streets, and they encouraged residents to take their rubbish to designated collection points.

One young boy took to Facebook to offer to take bins to the collection point. He offered to do this for free, but some grateful residents offered to pay him. His good deeds help him raise £45.

Other children joined in and some got up as early as 7.30am to collect the bins.

The proud mum of one of the youngsters said the children’s efforts had helped people who were unable to get out, especially the elderly.