Where Are the Wheelie Bins?

Wheelie bin controversies have been all the rage in the UK this year. Questions of affordability, theft and effectiveness have swirled around the rubbish industry, but a new shortage in Brighton and Hove puts a new twist on the controversies by highlighting the simple pragmatic problem that many councils don't have the budget or the means to supply everyone with wheelie bins in the immediate future.

Thousands of households in Derbyshire are still waiting for their recycling bins, while Lancashire and South-East Lewisham councils are facing shortages as well. Local wheelie bin thefts have highlighted potential problems with black market sellers trying to undercut the price of new bins, while other provinces have been petitioning their councils to be provided wheelie bins en-masse, and all of this could stem from a general lack of resources within the UK.

Brighton and Hove City Council reportedly said that wheelie bins were facing a national shortage, and the shortage can be directly tied to the budgetary spending to fund improvements in waste services. UK as a whole has spent two hundred and fifty million pounds helping local waste management efforts improve their processes and industries, but that's leaving a shortage of funds to procure some basic waste amenities for citizens. The council assures residents that their funding efforts will eventually produce an excess of wheelie bins; part of the budget was allocated to these provisional needs, but the fact that citizens have experienced months of shortage demonstrates just how much of a provisional tightrope many UK provinces are walking as they try to manage their spending while keeping pace with the progress of modern day waste services.

New wheelie bins are not expected to be delivered until October at the earliest. Until then, the council for Brighton and Hove recommend double-bagging rubbish and driving larger recyclable items like juice cartons, textiles, shoes and electrical items to the various recycling points throughout the city.

Future Shortages? Time Will Tell

The UK has spent a substantial amount of money updating their waste services, and with that spending comes some temporary cutbacks and shortages both expected and not, but the question on most residents' minds is whether or not they can expect to have to deal with similar shortages in the future.

Britain on their most part doesn't manufacture its own wheelie bins, there is only one large plastic wheelie bin manufacturer in the UK and the price is not as competitive as a similar standard bin from Germany. Therefore items are shipped from Germany, which has become the busy hub for environmental progressiveness worldwide. Smaller developing countries that are finding their national footing have also began to request Germany's services in providing bins for their citizens, and all of this comes into the melting pot and is causing gridlock for European markets. Reliance on Germany prevents the UK from taking matters into their own hands when bottlenecks like this come up, but as civil unrest continues both countries are speaking at length about ways to prevent these shortages from reoccurring in years to come.

One thing at least, is for certain. Shortages on this scale should not happen, and lacking a coincidence of all the wrong scenarios and budgets coming into play at exactly the same time, the government has a lot to answer for from questioning council members who must answer to their own constituency.

One of the main problems with wheelie bins is that there tends to be very high demand and very low demand with not a lot in between. This makes it very hard for manufacturers and suppliers to predict demand. Although there is some seasonality demand can peak outside of these predictive periods.